Appendices

Appendix 1:

System of controls as detailed in the Government guidance for Covid secure school opening:

They are grouped into ‘prevention’ and ‘response to any infection’ and are outlined in more detail in the sections below.

Prevention:

  1. minimise contact with individuals who are unwell by ensuring that those who have coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms, or who have someone in their household who does, do not attend school
  2. clean hands thoroughly more often than usual
  3. ensure good respiratory hygiene by promoting the ‘catch it, bin it, kill it’ approach
  4. introduce enhanced cleaning, including cleaning frequently touched surfaces often, using standard products such as detergents and bleach
  5. minimise contact between individuals and maintain social distancing wherever possible
  6. where necessary, wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)

Numbers 1 to 4 must be in place in all schools, all the time.

Number 5 must be properly considered and schools must put in place measures that suit their particular circumstances.

Number 6 applies in specific circumstances.

Response to any infection:

  1. engage with the NHS Test and Trace process
  2. manage confirmed cases of coronavirus (COVID-19) amongst the school community
  3. contain any outbreak by following local health protection team advice

 

Numbers 7 to 9 must be followed in every case where they are relevant.

Appendix 2: Shielding

Learners / Staff who are clinically extremely vulnerable

Rates of community transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19) are now reduced to levels below those seen when shielding was introduced. Shielding measures will therefore be paused from 1st August 2020, with the exception of areas where local lockdown means that shielding will continue. Therefore, we advise that those who are clinically extremely vulnerable can return to schools in September 2020 provided their school has implemented the system of controls outlined by the Government, in line with the school’s own workplace risk assessment. In all respects, the clinically extremely vulnerable should now follow the same guidance as the clinically vulnerable population, taking particular care to practise frequent, thorough hand washing, and cleaning of frequently touched areas in their home and/or workspace.

Learners / Staff who are clinically vulnerable

Clinically vulnerable learners and staff can return to school in September. While in school they should follow the sector-specific measures outlined by the Government to minimise the risks of transmission.

This includes:

  • taking particular care to observe good hand and respiratory hygiene,
  • minimising contact
  • maintaining social distancing in line with the provisions set out within this risk assessment, ideally, adults should maintain 2 metre distance from others, and where this is not possible avoid close face to face contact and minimise time spent within 1 metre of others.

 

While the risk of transmission between young children and adults is likely to be low, adults should continue to take care to socially distance from other adults including older children/adolescents.

People who live with those who are clinically extremely vulnerable or clinically vulnerable can attend the workplace.

Staff who are pregnant

Pregnant women are in the ‘clinically vulnerable’ category, and are generally advised to follow the above advice, which applies to all staff in schools. Employers should conduct a risk assessment for pregnant women in line with the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (MHSW).

The Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (RCOG) has published occupational health advice for employers and pregnant women. This document includes advice for women from 28 weeks gestation or with underlying health conditions who may be at greater risk. We advise employers and pregnant women to follow this advice and to continue to monitor for future updates to it.

The above will apply, and risk assessments undertaken for all those pregnant within the organisation, including learners and volunteers.

 

Staff who may otherwise be at increased risk from coronavirus (COVID-19)

Some people with particular characteristics may be at comparatively increased risk from coronavirus (COVID-19), as set out in the COVID-19: review of disparities in risks and outcomes report, which looked at different factors including age and sex, where people live, deprivation, ethnicity, people’s occupation and care home residence. These learners / staff can return to school in September as long as the system of controls are in place. The reasons for the disparities are complex and there is ongoing research to understand and translate these findings for individuals in the future.

People who live with those who have comparatively increased risk from coronavirus (COVID-19) can attend the workplace.

All learners, staff and volunteers who fit in the above categories will have an individual risk assessment in place in discussion with their tutor / Line Manager.

Appendix 3:

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

Wearing a face covering or face mask in education settings is not recommended and therefore staff and learners should not be required to wear them. Changing habits, social distancing, cleaning and hygiene are the most effective measures in controlling the spread of the virus.

The majority of staff in education settings will not require PPE beyond what they would normally need in their work even if they are not always able to maintain a distance of 2 metres from others.

At Inclusion Hampshire PPE should be worn if a learner of staff member becomes unwell with symptoms of coronavirus while on site and needs care until they are collected.

  • A fluid-resistant surgical face mask should be worn by the supervising staff member if a distance of 2 metres cannot be maintained. Face masks must:
    • Cover both nose and mouth
    • Not be allowed to dangle around the neck
    • Not to be touched once put on, except when carefully removed before disposal.
    • Be changed when they become moist or damaged
    • Be worn once and then discarded – hands must be cleaned after disposal.
  • If contact with the learner / staff member is necessary, then disposable gloves, a disposable apron should be worn by the supervising staff member.
  • If there is a risk of splashing to the eyes, for example from coughing, spitting, or vomiting, then eye protection should also be worn.
  • Disposable gloves should be worn in cases of first aid.

When PPE is used, it is essential that it is used properly. This includes scrupulous hand hygiene and following guidance of correct putting on and taking off in order to reduce cross contamination.

Please click on the link below for guidance for the correct way to put on and take off PPE. All staff should ensure they have read this. Copies of this will be displayed where relevant on site.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/877658/Quick_guide_to_donning_doffing_standard_PPE_health_and_social_care_poster__.pdf

Disposing of used PPE:

Used PPE and any disposable face coverings that staff or learners arrive wearing should be placed in a refuse bag and can be disposed of as normal domestic waste unless the wearer has symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), in line with COVID-19: cleaning of non-healthcare settings outside the home.

Used PPE and face coverings should not be put in a recycling bin or dropped as litter. Education, childcare and children’s social care settings should provide extra bins for staff and customers to throw away face coverings and PPE.

Any homemade non-disposable face coverings that staff or learners are wearing when they arrive at their setting must be removed by the wearer and put in a plastic bag that the wearer has brought with them in order to take it home. The wearer must then clean their hands.

To dispose of waste such as disposable cleaning cloths, face coverings, tissues and PPE from people with symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), including people who are self-isolating and members of their household:

  • put it in a plastic rubbish bag and tie it when full
  • place the plastic bag in a second bin bag and tie it
  • put it in a suitable and secure place marked for storage for 72 hours

This waste should be stored safely and securely kept away from children. You should not put your waste in communal waste areas until the waste has been stored for at least 72 hours.

Storing for 72 hours saves unnecessary waste movements and minimises the risk to waste operatives. This waste does not require a dedicated clinical waste collection in the above circumstances.

Read the guidance on safe working in education, childcare and children’s social care for more information about preventing and controlling infection, including the use of PPE.

Ref:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings

 

 

Appendix 4: Transport

Social distancing has significantly reduced available transport capacity. This guidance sets out a new framework for supporting transport to and from education provisions from the autumn term.

We are making a distinction between dedicated school transport and wider public transport:

  • by dedicated school transport, we mean services that are used only to carry pupils to school. This includes statutory home to school transport, but may also include some existing or new commercial travel routes, where they carry school pupils only
  • by public transport services, we mean routes which are also used by the general public

Dedicated school transport, including statutory provision

Learners on dedicated school services do not mix with the general public on those journeys and tend to be consistent. This means that the advice for passengers on public transport to adopt a social distance of two metres from people outside their household or support bubble, or a ‘one metre plus’ approach where this is not possible, will not apply from the autumn term on dedicated transport.

The approach to dedicated transport should align as far as possible with the principles underpinning the system of controls and with the approach being adopted by this setting.

It is important to consider:

  • how pupils are grouped together on transport, where possible this should reflect the bubbles that are adopted within sessions.
  • use of hand sanitiser upon boarding and/or disembarking
  • additional cleaning of vehicles
  • organised queuing and boarding where possible
  • distancing within vehicles wherever possible
  • the use of face coverings for children (except those under the age of 11), where appropriate, for example, if they are likely to come into very close contact with people outside of their group or who they do not normally meet

Wider public transport

In many areas, learners normally make extensive use of the wider public transport system, particularly public buses. We expect that public transport capacity will continue to be constrained in the autumn term. Its use by learners, particularly in peak times, should be kept to an absolute minimum.

Our session times work to stagger our start and finish times and avoid peak hours as being asked of schools to consider.

Schools should encourage learners, parents and staff to walk or cycle to school if at all possible. For some families, driving will also be an option.

However, these options will not be suitable for all. The Department for Transport is asking local authorities to:

  • urgently work with schools to survey parents on their typical routes to school and potential alternatives
  • consider a range of options for shifting demand for public transport onto other modes
  • consider using traffic demand management approaches in order to ensure that children are able to attend school from the start of the autumn term

 

Public transport

You must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or equality reasons.

You should remove your face covering if asked to do so by a police officer or other relevant person.

It is important to wash or sanitise your hands before and after touching your face covering.

If you need to dispose of your face covering, use ‘black bag’ waste bins or litter bins. You should not use a recycling bin.

Plan your journey

Before and during your journey, check with your transport operator for the latest travel advice on your route:

Travel may take longer than normal on some routes due to social distancing measures. Allow more time if your journey involves changes between different forms of transport.

If you can:

  • travel at off-peak times
  • use quieter stations and stops – get off a stop early if it’s less busy
  • keep changes to a minimum, for example, between bus and train
  • walk for more of your journey, for example the first or last mile
  • book your tickets online in advance or pay by contactless

Consider making a list of items to take with you and minimise the luggage you take.

On your journey

You must wear a face covering on public transport and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England. You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined.

Some people don’t have to wear a face covering for health, age or equality reasons.

The risk of transmission is small at 2 metres and where possible, you should maintain 2 metres distance.

If you cannot keep a 2 metre distance, reduce the risk to yourself and others by maintaining a 1 metre distance where possible, and taking suitable precautions.

Help keep yourself, other passengers and transport staff safe by taking the following precautions:

  • ensure you maintain social distancing, where possible, including at busy entrances, exits, under canopies, bus stops, platforms or outside of stations
  • limit the number of people that you come into contact with, for example avoid peak travel
  • wash or sanitise your hands regularly
  • avoid touching your face
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or the inside of your elbow when coughing or sneezing
  • travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
  • touch as few surfaces as possible
  • stay outdoors, rather than indoors, where possible
  • minimise the time spent close to other people, where possible
  • avoid loud talking, shouting or singing
  • dispose of waste safely, including items such as used disposable face coverings
  • be prepared to queue or take a different entrance or exit at stations
  • wait for passengers to get off first before you board
  • wait for the next service if you cannot safely keep your distance on board a train, bus or coach
  • avoid consuming food and drink on public transport, where possible
  • respect other people’s space while travelling
  • be aware of pregnant, older and disabled people who may require a seat or extra space
  • be aware that not all disability is visible and some people may be exempt from wearing a face covering

Treat transport staff with respect and follow instructions from your transport operator. This may include:

  • notices about which seats to use or how to queue
  • additional screens, barriers or floor markings
  • requests to board through different doors or to move to less busy areas

 

Seek assistance if you need it

If you require assistance when travelling, contact your transport operator as you would normally do.

If any problems arise or you feel ill during your journey, speak to a member of transport staff. In the case of an emergency, contact the emergency services as you normally would.

If you need help, try to keep a suitable distance from members of staff. If this isn’t possible, try to avoid physical contact and keep the time you spend near staff as short as possible.

 

Children

Where travel is necessary, consider whether children could walk or cycle, accompanied by a responsible adult or carer, where appropriate.

Social distancing applies to children as well as adults. Children should keep their distance from people who are not in their household or support bubble, while on public transport and in enclosed or substantially enclosed public areas of transport hubs. If this isn’t possible children should:

  • avoid physical contact
  • face away from others
  • keep the time spent near others as short as possible

Children under the age of 3 should not wear face coverings. Children aged from 3 to 10 can wear face coverings, but they are not required to.

If you are the responsible adult or carer travelling with children, please help them:

  • minimise the surfaces they touch
  • maintain their distance from others
  • wear their face covering
  • wash their hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible after the end of your journey

Completing your journey

When finishing your journey:

  • consider walking or cycling from the station or stop you arrived at
  • wash your hands for at least 20 seconds or sanitise your hands as soon as possible – do the same for children who have travelled with you

 

Appendix 5:

Disposing of face coverings and PPE

Used PPE and any disposable face coverings that staff, young people or others arrive wearing should be placed in a refuse bag by the wearer and can be disposed of as normal domestic waste unless the wearer has symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), the wearer is to then wash their hands thoroughly in line with current handwashing guidance.

Any homemade non-disposable face coverings that staff, young people or others are wearing when they arrive at their setting must be removed by the wearer and put in a plastic bag that the wearer has brought with them in order to take it home. The wearer must then clean their hands.

To dispose of waste from people with symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), such as disposable cleaning cloths, tissues and PPE:

  • put it in a plastic rubbish bag and tie it when full
  • place the plastic bag in a second bin bag and tie it
  • put it in a suitable and secure place marked for storage for 72 hours

This waste should be stored safely and securely kept away from children. You should not put your waste in communal waste areas until the waste has been stored for at least 72 hours.

Storing for 72 hours saves unnecessary waste movements and minimises the risk to waste operatives. This waste does not require a dedicated clinical waste collection in the above circumstances.

 

Appendix 6:

What happens if someone becomes unwell whilst at Inclusion Hampshire?

If anyone becomes unwell whilst at Inclusion Hampshire with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature, or has a loss of, or change in, their normal sense of smell (anosmia), they must be sent home and advised to follow the COVID-19: guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection:    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance

Whilst a learner or staff member is waiting for collection, they should be moved to a room where they are able to be isolated behind a closed door.

  •  At The Clock Tower, Chineham, this would be Office 4 if not in use for any other purpose. (if for any reason this cannot be used, they are to be moved to at least 2 metres away from other people.
  • Open windows to ensure the room is well ventilated.
  • Depending on the individual circumstance and if supervision is required, a distance of 2 metres should be maintained.
  • PPE should be worn, correctly (please see appendix 3),by staff members caring for the learner if distance cannot be maintained or if it is felt best to do so.
  • If they need to use the bathroom while waiting to be collected, this should be cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before being used by anyone else.
  • In an emergency, call 999 if they are seriously ill or injured or their life is at risk. Do not visit the GP, pharmacy, urgent care centre or a hospital.
  • Any person who has been in contact with the unwell person should wash their hands thoroughly for 20 seconds, using the correct hand washing procedure.
  • Cleaning the affected area with normal household disinfectant after someone with symptoms has left will reduce the risk of passing the infection on to other people. Please refer to the Inclusion Hampshire Cleaning plan.

The staff member involved in helping the unwell learner / staff member does not need to go home unless they develop symptoms themselves (please see appendix 5 – Details of testing available for staff), or the unwell person subsequently tests positive, (please see appendix 6 – a confirmed case of coronavirus).

Ref:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings

 

Appendix 7:

Testing for Coronavirus

As an education provider we are registered for the testing service for essential workers. This allows us to request priority testing on behalf of staff with symptoms and those in their households who are displaying symptoms.

Testing is now available to everyone, so all learners and their families will be eligible to receive a test, they can arrange these via: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/testing-for-coronavirus/

Staff testing:

Who can get a test?

As an employer of an education setting we can offer tests to the following:

  • Any self-isolating members of staff who have coronavirus symptoms
  • Member of staff does not have symptoms but members of their household who are displaying symptoms can be tested.

In addition, you should be in the first three days of the onset of your COVID-19 symptoms at the time the swab is taken – although testing is considered effective up until day five.

No testing should be undertaken after day five, unless it’s for a specific reason agreed on a case by case basis by local microbiologists.

What kinds of tests are offered?

The test confirms if an individual currently has the virus. There are two options for individuals to get tested that will be available via the website:

  • Driving to a regional test site OR
  • employees requesting a home test kit which will be delivered to their home

Where members of the household require testing, up to three can attend a regional test site with the essential worker. The total of four, reflects the maximum number of occupants that can be safely tested in a single vehicle.

If the essential worker is registering a test on behalf of a member of their household, that employee does not have to attend the test site with the household member. As long as that symptomatic individual’s name has been booked as the person who needs the test, it will be their name on the list at the test site.

The maximum number of home test kits an essential worker can order is five.

Booking a test:

In the event a staff member or member of their household is displaying symptoms, and them having informed their line manager, we will register them on the system for testing, they will then:

  • Essential workers who have been invited for a test are notified via text message of their invitation to attend and book an appointment at a regional testing centre and are asked for a verification code which we will provide you with.
  • A link is provided for essential workers to register their personal details.
  • Once essential workers have registered their details via the online portal they will be directed to the appointment booking system to book a specific slot at the regional testing centre.

Alternatively staff are able to request essential worker testing through the self-referral portal, https://self-referral.test-for-coronavirus.service.gov.uk/

Here they can book tests for themselves and family members.

After the test:

  • The programme does not return the results to us as your employer. 
  • No data is released to employers on a staff members test results or engagement with the test programme.
  • It is the staff members responsibility to discuss their test result with their employer as part of their return to work conversation.

Details of what happens following receiving your results, please refer to appendix 6.

Further support:

There is a Coronavirus Testing Call Centre for employees who have been referred or booked a test themselves, which is contacted on 0300 303 2713. Lines are open open daily 08:00–20:00. This call centre does not offer medical advice. If your employee is unwell, they should call NHS 111 and in a medical emergency, dial 999.

 

Ref: 

Employers Referral Portal Users Guide – Essential worker

FAQ’s for Employers of Essential workers

 

Appendix 8:

What happens following testing or if there is a confirmed case of coronavirus at Inclusion Hampshire?

When a learner or staff member develops symptoms compatible with coronavirus, they should be sent home,(as detailed in Appendix 4), and advised to self-isolate for 7 days. Their household members should self-isolate for 14 days.

All staff and learners attending Inclusion Hampshire, and their households, will have access to a test if they are displaying symptoms and should be encouraged to get tested. More information of staff testing can be found in appendix 5.

The Head of Provision will oversee communications with parents and families in the event of a suspected / confirmed case of coronavirus.

Please inform Inclusion Hampshire of the outcome of the test as soon as possible. Following a test:

  •  If everyone with symptoms who was tested in their household receives a negative result, the staff member  / learner can return to work immediately, providing they are well enough, and have not had a fever for 48 hours.
  • If a household member tests positive, but the learner / staff member tests negative, they can return to the centre on day eight from the start of their symptoms if they feel well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours.
  • If the learner / staff member does not have symptoms, but a household member tests positive, they should continue to self isolate in line with current guidance.  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance

Where the learner or staff member tests positive the rest of their group within the setting should be sent home and advised to self-isolate for 14 days. The household members of that group do not need to self-isolate unless the young person or staff member they live with from that group subsequently develops symptoms, when self isolation / stay at home guidance is to be followed.

As part of the national test and trace programme, if further cases are detected within the cohort or wider setting, Public Health England’s local health protection teams will conduct a rapid investigation and will advise settings on the most appropriate action to take, including asking a larger number of people to self-isolate. Procedures will be looked at to try to avoid the whole setting needing to be closed. 

 

Returning from being ill:

Ending self isolation:

  • If you have had symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), then you may end your self-isolation after 7 days and return to your normal routine if you do not have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell/taste.
  • If you still have a high temperature, keep self-isolating until your temperature returns to normal.
  • After 7 days, if you just have a cough or anosmia (a loss of, or change in, your sense of taste or smell), you do not need to continue to self-isolate. This is because a cough or anosmia can last for several weeks once the infection has gone
  •  The 7-day period starts from the day when you first became ill.
  • If you continue to feel unwell and have not already sought medical advice, you should use the NHS 111 online coronavirus (COVID-19) service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

 Ending household isolation

  • If you live with others, then everyone else in the household who remains well should end their isolation after 14 days. This 14-day period starts from the day the first person in the household became ill. People in the household who remain well after 14 days are unlikely to be infectious.
  • If anyone in the household becomes unwell during the 14-day period, they should arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19. If their test result is positive, they must follow the same advice for people with coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms – that is, after 7 days of their symptoms starting, if they feel better and no longer have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell/taste – they can also return to their normal routine. However, if their test result is negative, they must continue with isolation as part of the household for the full 14 days.
  • Should someone develop coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms late in the 14-day household isolation period (for example, on day 10 or later) the isolation period for the household does not need to be extended. Only the person with new coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms has to stay at home for at least a further 7 days, and should arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19.
  • At the end of the 14-day period, anyone in the household who has not become unwell can return to their normal routine.

Ref:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings/coronavirus-covid-19-implementing-protective-measures-in-education-and-childcare-settings

 

FAQ’s for Employers: Testing for Essential Workers.

 

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